Finding aids

 

The Holovna Rada Khresta Symona Petliury was the body responsible for awarding the military order of the Cross of Symon Petliura to all eligable veterans of the Ukrainian War of Independence. This collection principally contains submitted application forms containing biographical information and military service histories of individual applicants who wished to obtain the Cross.

 

John Jowa was a Ukrainian post-World War II refugee to the United States from the Soviet Union, where he was persecuted for being a member of a landowning family during Stalin's forced collectivization. He was active in two associations of former Ukrainian political prisoners in New York City. The collection contains records of those organizations, as well as his autobiographical and historical writings.

Joseph Marmash was an active member of the Baltimore, MD Ukrainian-American community over many decades. He was born to members of the first wave of Ukrainian immigrants to the US, and his involvement with the Ukrainian-American Citizens Club and other organizations and causes began in the 1930s. This collection documents some of these activities, as well as his extensive work helping to resettle Ukrainian Displaced Persons after World War II.

Marie Halun Bloch is best known for her Ukrainian-themed children's books, but also was a writer and translator on a variety of subjects. She did considerable research into her family history and the history of her ancestral villages. She travelled to Ukraine and Eastern Europe beginning in the 1960s through the 1990s, and wrote extensively about her experiences. This collection contains her published and unpublished writings on her genealogy, the history of her ancestral villages, travel accounts, research notes, correspondence, and photographs.

 

This collection is not processed, and is not yet directly accessible to researchers. Mykola Francuzenko was a Ukrainian-American writer (under the pseudonym Mykola Virnyi), translator, theatrical director, radio journalist, and social activist. His literary output includes over 400 works, and he was a writer and broadcaster for the Ukrainian services of both Radio Liberty and the Voice of America during the Cold War.

 

Mykola Kulikowskyj was a lieutenant colonel in the army of the Ukrainian People's Republic during the Ukrainian War of Independence who immigrated to the United States as a refugee in 1950. This collection contains his correspondence, photographs, and a variety of personal documents.

This collection contains material relating to the life of Oleksii Balabas and his family in the Kuban' region of Russia, Prague, Germany, and Chicago. It includes six volumes of diaries from the 1940s and '50s, official and legal documents, correspondence, writings on Kuban' history, and photographs.

The Oleksii Matuch Papers contain what appears to be a comprehensive collection of ephemera related to the Ukrainian-American community in Buffalo, NY during the late 1950s and early 1960s, as well as some correspondence and personal documents.

This collection consists primarily of radio scripts of the daily broadcasts of Radio Liberty's Ukrainian Service that were sent by its director to (then) Archbishop Mstyslav of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the USA. They provide a record of broadcasting of news and political commentary to Ukrainian speakers living in the Soviet Union during the Cold War.

This collection contains the incomplete parish records of St. Michael's Ukrainian Orthodox parish in Jeannette, PA, consisting of records of parish board meetings and funerals.

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